Lebanon


Politically and economically fractured, Lebanon’s population is equally fractured along ethnic and religious lines. It has high unemployment and severe inflation, the powder keg of problems, it reached it’s breaking point COVID-19 pandemic, and the massive August 2020 chemical explosion in the port of Beirut. Amid this chaos and an influx of refugees from neighboring Syria, many Christians have leaned more into their faith, and many Muslims have began seeking Christ. We are there on the ground helping to facilitate that.


Lebanon

Politically and economically fractured, Lebanon’s population is equally fractured along ethnic and religious lines. It has high unemployment and severe inflation, the powder keg of problems, it reached it’s breaking point COVID-19 pandemic, and the massive August 2020 chemical explosion in the port of Beirut. Amid this chaos and an influx of refugees from neighboring Syria, many Christians have leaned more into their faith, and many Muslims have began seeking Christ. We are there on the ground helping to facilitate that.

Islam is the leading religion at more than 61 percent of the population, about evenly divided between Sunnis and Shiites. Christians amount to nearly 34 percent of the population. Among those identifying as Christians, Maronite Catholics are the largest group, followed by Greek Orthodox, and only 1 percent of the population is Protestant.

Arabic is the official national language while French can be used in legally prescribed instances. Nearly 40 percent of Lebanese people are considered francophone and another 15 percent “partial francophone,” while 70 percent of Lebanon’s secondary schools use French as a second language of instruction. English is increasingly used in business and science. About 5 percent of the population is Armenian and speak in their native tongue.

With the high cost of living getting higher every day, support for Christians is greatly needed. They are cut off from aid, while their muslim counterparts receive it from their connections. Hezbollah, the most powerful political organization in the country helps the Shiaa population due to their connection to Iran. They loot the country through their control, stealing resources and leaving the christians without. The Sunni’s receive aid through organizations from wealthy oil nations like Saudi Arabia.

Islam is the leading religion at more than 61 percent of the population, about evenly divided between Sunnis and Shiites. Christians amount to nearly 34 percent of the population. Among those identifying as Christians, Maronite Catholics are the largest group, followed by Greek Orthodox, and only 1 percent of the population is Protestant.

Arabic is the official national language while French can be used in legally prescribed instances. Nearly 40 percent of Lebanese people are considered francophone and another 15 percent “partial francophone,” while 70 percent of Lebanon’s secondary schools use French as a second language of instruction. English is increasingly used in business and science. About 5 percent of the population is Armenian and speak in their native tongue.

With the high cost of living getting higher every day, support for Christians is greatly needed. They are cut off from aid, while their muslim counterparts receive it from their connections. Hezbollah, the most powerful political organization in the country helps the Shiaa population due to their connection to Iran. They loot the country through their control, stealing resources and leaving the christians without. The Sunni’s receive aid through organizations from wealthy oil nations like Saudi Arabia.

The Servants are spreading word of eternal life in Christ in a variety of ways, with a remarkable number of saved souls especially in outreaches to children and refugees. Assistance to train Muslim-background leaders reaching refugees is needed. Newly believing refugees require discipleship training and gospel literature to be biblically grounded and to reach others with the gospel. Funding for Bibles, audio Bibles and the costs of rent and transportation Besides working under difficult circumstances with scant resources, The servants in Lebanon are ministering to hurting people afflicted in many ways. Persecuted converts from Islam and other refugees need food, medicine and housing assistance.

Following governmental and economic collapse, Servants are providing health care at a physical therapy clinic to impoverished Christians that need it. As Servants provide a powerful demonstration of Christ’s love, they are reaching destitute families with the hope of the gospel.

The Servants are spreading word of eternal life in Christ in a variety of ways, with a remarkable number of saved souls especially in outreaches to children and refugees. Assistance to train Muslim-background leaders reaching refugees is needed. Newly believing refugees require discipleship training and gospel literature to be biblically grounded and to reach others with the gospel. Funding for Bibles, audio Bibles and the costs of rent and transportation Besides working under difficult circumstances with scant resources, The servants in Lebanon are ministering to hurting people afflicted in many ways. Persecuted converts from Islam and other refugees need food, medicine and housing assistance.

Following governmental and economic collapse, Servants are providing health care at a physical therapy clinic to impoverished Christians that need it. As Servants provide a powerful demonstration of Christ’s love, they are reaching destitute families with the hope of the gospel.

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Christian Charity in Argentina and Lebanon